Can Goldendoodles Be Kept Outside?

Can Goldendoodles Be Kept Outside?

Did you grow up in a home where dogs were always kept outside? Now, maybe you realize that’s not in the best interest of every dog.

Whether you’re specifically looking for a dog that you can keep outside, or if you’re thinking about getting a Goldendoodle and wondering whether they can be kept outside, we’ve got the information you need.

Can Goldendoodles Be Kept Outside?

Can Goldendoodles be kept outside? No, Goldendoodles should not be kept outside. Their coat isn’t well-suited for outdoor living, and they have a strong need to be with their family. Goldendoodles are too clingy to be kept outside, and they’re prone to separation anxiety.

Goldendoodle Personality

How Long Do Goldendoodles Stay Puppies?

Goldendoodles are extremely friendly and social. They don’t just enjoy people – they NEED to be near their people as much as possible.

The Goldendoodle is a devoted family pet that thrives on interacting with its people. A Goldendoodle kept outside would likely become depressed and destructive.

Separation Anxiety

Being so social, Goldendoodles are highly prone to separation anxiety. This is a problem where dogs become so attached to their people that they experience extreme anxiety when left alone. This anxiety may result in destructiveness, escape attempts, barking, and other undesirable behaviors.

Goldendoodles do best if they can stay inside with their family. If you work outside the home, you should consider a dog walker or doggie daycare to give your Goldendoodle something to do during the day, aside from missing you.

Goldendoodle Coat Care

Unlike their Poodle and Golden Retriever parents, Goldendoodles were not bred to work outside in the elements all day long, and their coat reflects that. Goldendoodle fur is typically challenging to keep brushed out, and it attracts mud and burrs like you wouldn’t believe.

If you want to keep any length on your Goldendoodle’s fur, they need daily brushing. That’s hard to do if your dog is outside rolling in mud, dirt, or grass all day long.

How Do You get Matted Hair off a Dog Without Cutting It?

If you can’t brush your Goldendoodle at least every other day, then you should keep them in a very short haircut. A short clip is perfect if your Goldendoodle is only outside for about an hour of exercise every day. However, it won’t do a very good job of protecting your Goldendoodle from the elements if you leave them outside all day long.

Crate Training

If you’re afraid to leave your Goldendoodle inside your home all day, crate training is a great way to keep them (and your stuff) safe when your dog is home alone. When done correctly, crate training isn’t about punishing your dog and “locking them up.” Crate training is about providing a safe place for your dog to relax and feel protected.

Another reason crate training is crucial is that your Goldendoodle is bound to encounter a kennel at some point in their life. It could be at the vet, groomer, or doggie daycare. Dogs who aren’t used to a crate can panic in a kennel and hurt themselves trying to escape.

How Cold Can a Goldendoodle Tolerate? How Hot?

Generally, most Goldendoodles will be comfortable down to 45 degrees F. Mini, Toy, or shaved Goldendoodles may get cold and need a coat before it gets that chilly.

Large Goldendoodle with a thick, well-kept coat may be comfortable in temperatures even lower than that. Each dog is unique, so it’s up to you to monitor your Goldendoodle to see how comfortable they are in the cold.

Can Goldendoodles Be Kept Outside?

Your Goldendoodle’s heat tolerance will also vary depending on their size and coat length. Smaller Goldendoodles, with their comparatively larger skin surface to body volume ratio, may get hot sooner than larger Doodles.

Also, short fur helps keep dogs cool, but only up to a certain point – a Goldendoodle shaved down to the skin will get hot faster than one with ½” of fur left to protect their skin from the sun’s rays. Meanwhile, shaggy Doodles are likely to get hot faster than ones with shorter cuts.

How Long Can a Goldendoodle Hold Their Bladder?

Goldendoodle puppies can hold their bladder for their age in months plus one. That means that a 2-month-old Goldendoodle puppy can hold their bladder for about 3 hours, while a 6-month-old puppy can hold their bladder for 7 hours.

Adult Goldendoodles should be able to hold their bladders for at least 9-10 hours. Having said that, you probably feel uncomfortable if you have to go that long between bathroom breaks.

So, you might want to consider hiring a dog walker or taking your Goldendoodle to a doggie daycare if you’re away from home for more than 8 hours a day, five or more days a week.

Do Goldendoodles Like to Be Held?

Some Goldendoodles love to snuggle, while others need their space. Whether or not they tolerate being hugged, Goldendoodles LOVE their people and need as much attention as you can spare. They don’t like to be ignored and wouldn’t do well outside alone all day.

15 Vet Tips On How To Take Care Of A Goldendoodle Puppy: A First-Time Owner's Guide

What Dog Breeds Can Be Kept Outside?

If you strongly prefer a dog who can be kept outside, some breeds are better suited for it than Goldendoodles. Consider one of the following breeds:

Siberian Husky

These dogs love the cold and the snow, and some may actually prefer to stay outside than be in your climate-controlled home. Huskies are also a more independent breed and aren’t as clingy.

However, they are prone to running away and are exceptionally good at digging under or climbing over fences, so make sure your backyard is escape-proof. Huskies are also prone to overheating, so make sure they have access to shade and fresh water at all times.

Australian Cattle Dog

Bred to work alongside ranchers all day, the Australian Cattle Dog is content to wander your property, especially if you have a lot of acreage.

An Australian Cattle Dog could be happy wandering and protecting a large property, but it would probably be miserable stuck in a small dog run all day.

You might consider using an invisible fence to keep your Cattle Dog on your property if you leave them outside.

Norwegian Elkhound

The Norwegian Elkhound has the cold-weather coat of the Husky with the working dog temperament of the Cattle Dog.

If you live in a cool climate, an Elkhound might prefer to stay outside all day. They also don’t have clingy personalities, so they’ll tolerate being left alone all day.

Rottweiler

If you’re looking for a dog who will protect your property from outside, the Rottweiler is an excellent choice.

With the right training, they can be friendly to your family but protective and wary about strangers. Rottweilers can be kept outside, but they need positive attention from their family to avoid becoming aggressive with everybody.

Beagle

Bred to hunt, Beagles were historically kept outside in kennels in packs. Beagles are social and typically prefer not to be the only dog.

If you only have one Beagle, it would rather be inside with the family, but you may keep a pack of Beagles outdoors, as long as they have access to shelter and water.

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

Also known as the Swissie, the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog was bred to be an all-around farm dog in Switzerland.

They like to be around their people, but they’re happy patrolling and guarding the property, too. Like the Cattle Dog, a Swissie would be more comfortable with a large property to patrol rather than cooped up in a small yard.

Irish Wolfhound

The Irish Wolfhound is the tallest dog breed and needs room to stretch their legs. They can be equally happy indoors or outdoors as long as they have plenty of room to stretch out.

Being sighthounds, they are prone to chasing small animals, so make sure you have a tall fence around your property if you want to keep a Wolfhound outside. An invisible fence won’t stop a hound on the chase.

American Foxhound

The American Foxhound is another hunting dog that can be satisfied living outside. They like to follow their nose, so make sure they can’t escape your yard if you choose to keep them outside all day.

Australian Shepherd

The Aussie is the ultimate farm dog and can be satisfied sleeping in the barn with the livestock they’re charged with protecting.

Their medium-length fur needs occasional brushing to prevent mats from forming, but they can be happy farm or ranch dogs without needing to sleep inside with their people.

German Shepherd

Like the Rottweiler, the German Shepherd can be trained to protect your property and can be happy outside as long as they have positive interactions with their people during the day.

Neglected German Shepherds can become destructive or aggressive, so make sure you give your dog plenty of mental stimulation and attention, even if they live outside.

Final Thoughts

As you can see, Goldendoodles aren’t the best breed to be kept outside. Neither their personality nor their fur is prepared to spend all day outside.

These dogs need to be inside with their people. If you want to keep your dog outside, other breeds are better suited for that type of life.

Kern

I'm a life long lover of dogs. Since I was 2 years old I've had retrievers, mixes, and currently, a Mini Goldendoodle named Lexie. I converted my wife into a dog lover and my two daughters are as well. Our doodle Lexie was the inspiration for this website because after we got her everyone wanted to know more. There is a ton of information on the web, but I feel most of it was not from the perspective of a Goldendoodle owner.

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